Home » Treaties of Sri Lanka: South Asia Free Trade Agreement, Economy of Pakistan, Fourth Geneva Convention, Economy of Bangladesh, Economy of Nepa by Source Wikipedia
Treaties of Sri Lanka: South Asia Free Trade Agreement, Economy of Pakistan, Fourth Geneva Convention, Economy of Bangladesh, Economy of Nepa Source Wikipedia

Treaties of Sri Lanka: South Asia Free Trade Agreement, Economy of Pakistan, Fourth Geneva Convention, Economy of Bangladesh, Economy of Nepa

Source Wikipedia

Published August 16th 2011
ISBN : 9781157997771
Paperback
48 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 46. Chapters: South Asia Free Trade Agreement, Economy of Pakistan, Fourth Geneva Convention, Economy ofMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 46. Chapters: South Asia Free Trade Agreement, Economy of Pakistan, Fourth Geneva Convention, Economy of Bangladesh, Economy of Nepal, Foreign relations of Pakistan, United Nations Charter, Economy of Sri Lanka, Economy of the Maldives, Economy of Bhutan, Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, Economy of India, First Geneva Convention, Third Geneva Convention, Indo-Sri Lanka Accord, Second Geneva Convention, Kandyan Convention, Treaty of Batticaloa, Kandyan Treaty of 1638. Excerpt: The Economy of India is the tenth largest in the world by nominal GDP and the fourth largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). The countrys per capita GDP (PPP) is $3,339 (IMF, 129th) in 2010. Following strong economic reforms from the post-independence socialist economy, the countrys economic growth progressed at a rapid pace, as free market principles were initiated in 1991 for international competition and foreign investment. Despite fast economic growth India continues to face massive income inequalities, high unemployment and malnutrition. Social democratic policies governed Indias economy from 1947 to 1991. The economy was characterised by extensive regulation, protectionism, public ownership, pervasive corruption and slow growth. Since 1991, continuing economic liberalisation has moved the country towards a market-based economy. A revival of economic reforms and better economic policy in first decade of the 21st century accelerated Indias economic growth rate. In recent years, Indian cities have continued to liberalise business regulations. By 2008, India had established itself as the worlds second-fastest growing major economy. However, as a result of the financial crisis of 2007-2010, coupled with a poor monsoon, Indias gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate significantly slowed to 6.7% in 2008-09, but su...